Marc Dilet: Trans-Positions

Marc Dilet: Trans-Positions


Wednesday, November 1 at 6:30 p.m.
Free Admission / English
54 W. Chicago Avenue

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Vernissage • Wednesday, November 1 at 6:30 p.m. • Featuring a special drawing performance in collaboration with a Chicago artist

 Exhibition open to the public during our business hours through December 1st

 

Gathered in this exhibition, Marc Dilet's drawings focus on his unique visual and emotional perspectives on Athens, Chicago, Hamburg, Kyoto, London, Montréal, Oslo, Québec, Paris, Tokyo, Zurich, and other cities that he has visited or inhabited. The drawings engage the continuity of the urban condition and contrast the particularities of each location. Every city has a unique identity established by its topography - lakes, rivers, islands, bays, mountains - in discourse with the history of its built response to these features - skyscrapers, landmarks, boulevards, parks - all while keeping in mind the Chicago motto Urbs in horto, Marc's point of view is from above, presenting each cityscape as an expansive urban field, a human construct in a landscape. This personal vision of cities' contrasting souls in homage to their multiplicity and allure presents unique characters that create fascination, anger, joy, and wonder through a mixture of chaotic forms and hidden orders.

A French architect based in Paris. Marc Dilet earned a master’s degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where he studied with Thomas H. Beeby while doing research at the University of Tokyo with Fumihiko Maki. His architectural practice includes both private and public projects such as cultural facilities, kindergartens and public housing. He teaches architectural design at Paris Val-de-Seine National School of Architecture.

The Chicago Architecture Biennial at the Alliance Française de Chicago

Mies Van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, László Moholy-Nagy: these are the name of the architects, Americans and immigrants from Europe, who built the Chicago skyline and its reputation as a uniquely modern city. Urban development by Burnham along the lakeshore was inspired by Haussmann’s grands boulevards in Paris, and it is the French influence on the Windy City that the Alliance celebrates this fall with a series of talks and exhibitions presented under the umbrella of the second Chicago Architecture Biennial.